September 30, 2020 | Giving Day

Wednesday, September 30, 2020

All-Day

Join the Science & Justice Research Center at UC Santa Cruz on Wednesday September 30th, for Giving Day, a 24-hour online fundraising drive!

Help us celebrate the 10 year anniversary of our Science & Justice Training Program (SJTP) by supporting our graduate student researchers through the Science & Justice campaign. Incentives to give include matching funds: if you are interested in matching funds, please email scijust@ucsc.edu.

(SJTP Fellows Ian Carbone and Derek Padilla with undergraduate Artist-in-Residence Kiko Kolbi inside greenhouse) **picture taken pre-COVID**

ABOUT the SJRC’s SJTP

Started in 2010 with a grant from the National Science Foundation, 2020 marks the ten year anniversary of the internationally-recognized Science & Justice Training Program (SJTP). Now more than ever the training offered by the SJTP is critical to addressing the problems of our times: ecological destruction; data justice; growing inequalities. These are problems that are not the domain of one discipline or area of practice. They require working across fields of knowledge and practice. The SJTP provides the space and transdisciplinary tools and thought needed for social science, humanities, engineering, physical and biological science, and art students to collaborate to respond to core concerns of our times.

Our Science & Justice Training Program trains the next generation of researchers to maximize the public good of science and technology.

Why Support S&J

Central to the success of our students is their ability to work on their Science & Justice projects during the summer. With your help, we can offer summer fellowships that supports this critical dimension of the training of these future leaders of science and justice.

Over the last decade, our students have produced innovative research and projects. An SJTP graduate fellow from Biomolecular Science and Engineering worked with marine biologists and illustrators to self-publish the children’s book Looking For Marla (Buscando a Marla), a tale of diverse expressions of gender and sexual identity among marine creatures. Physics graduate students and artists came together to develop a novel solar greenhouse that highlighted problems of energy use and access to new material sciences in agriculture. They went on to secure tenure-track positions in which they found a route to incorporating justice into both their teaching and research. In these and many other instances, the SJTP is part of the next generation of researchers who seek to place justice at the heart of the best science and technology.

Share our Campaign for Justice!

Post on social media and ask your friends to join us on September 30 by making a gift on Giving Day to support the Science and Justice Training Program!

Thank you for making a more just world possible!

Giving Day fundraiser for Science & Justice Training Program

Wednesday, September 30, 2020

All-Day

Join the Science & Justice Research Center at UC Santa Cruz on Wednesday September 30th, for Giving Day, a 24-hour online fundraising drive!

Help us celebrate the 10 year anniversary of our Science & Justice Training Program (SJTP) by supporting our graduate student researchers through the Science & Justice campaign. Incentives to give include matching funds: if you are interested in matching funds, please email scijust@ucsc.edu.

ABOUT the SJRC’s SJTP

Started in 2010 with a grant from the National Science Foundation, 2020 marks the ten year anniversary of the internationally-recognized Science & Justice Training Program (SJTP). Now more than ever the training offered by the SJTP is critical to addressing the problems of our times: ecological destruction; data justice; growing inequalities. These are problems that are not the domain of one discipline or area of practice. They require working across fields of knowledge and practice. The SJTP provides the space and transdisciplinary tools and thought needed for social science, humanities, engineering, physical and biological science, and art students to collaborate to respond to core concerns of our times.

Our Science & Justice Training Program trains the next generation of researchers to maximize the public good of science and technology.

Why Support S&J

Central to the success of our students is their ability to work on their Science & Justice projects during the summer. With your help, we can offer summer fellowships that supports this critical dimension of the training of these future leaders of science and justice.

Over the last decade, our students have produced innovative research and projects. An SJTP graduate fellow from Biomolecular Science and Engineering worked with marine biologists and illustrators to self-publish the children’s book Looking For Marla (Buscando a Marla), a tale of diverse expressions of gender and sexual identity among marine creatures. Physics graduate students and artists came together to develop a novel solar greenhouse that highlighted problems of energy use and access to new material sciences in agriculture. They went on to secure tenure-track positions in which they found a route to incorporating justice into both their teaching and research. In these and many other instances, the SJTP is part of the next generation of researchers who seek to place justice at the heart of the best science and technology.

Share our Campaign for Justice!

Post on social media and ask your friends to join us on September 30 by making a gift on Giving Day to support the Science and Justice Training Program!

Thank you for making a more just world possible!

Summer Science & Justice Writing Together

Wanting to establish a regular writing routine exploring science and justice? Join SJRC scholars over Zoom for open writing sessions! Open to all students, faculty, researchers and visiting scholars.

For more information, the Zoom link and password, or to express interest, please contact SJRC Graduate Fellow Dorothy Santos (film and digital media).

June 24, 2020 | V is for Veracity

On June 24, 2020, SJRC Founding Director Jenny Reardon joined Wendy Hui Kyong Chun (Simon Fraser University’s Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media in the School of Communication) for a conversation on Science & Justice, and to explore our intersecting work on democracy, justice, information, and truth.

As Reardon’s recently written in relation in “V is for Veracity” about Covid-19: An “us” versus “them” mindset engendered by the metaphor of war focuses our attention on viruses, vaccines, and victory. It leads us to believe that there is a discrete enemy out there—a virus—that we must defeat. Yet, as we focus on this so-called frontline, we risk missing the deeper, more systemic problems. All our efforts, staying home and holding the frontline, may only lead us into the next battle, if we do not attend now to the unraveling of relations that sustain trustworthy truths—the veracity required to live collectively.

Refer also to the SSRC article, “V is for veracity.

The conversation was recorded and will be linked here once available.

Jenny Reardon is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research draws into focus questions about identity, justice and democracy that are often silently embedded in scientific ideas and practices, particularly in modern genomic research. Her training spans molecular biology, the history of biology, science studies, feminist and critical race studies, and the sociology of science, technology and medicine. She is the author of Race to the Finish: Identity and Governance in an Age of Genomics (Princeton University Press, 2005) and The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, Knowledge After the Genome (Chicago University Press, Fall 2017). She has been the recipient of fellowships and awards from, among others, the National Science Foundation, the Max Planck Institute, the Humboldt Foundation, the London School of Economics, the Westinghouse Science Talent Search, and the United States Congressional Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

COVID-19: Online Events

Image credit: CDC/Alissa Eckert; Dan Higgins

The SJRC has a robust network of local and international public health experts, scholars, and practitioners leading the way with collecting resources for teaching about COVID-19, writing open response letters and calls for action, and organizing and participating in online events.

 

Help Spread the Word of These Online Events

C-Span | State and Federal Covid-19 Briefings and Legislative Deliberation | (schedule)

Archived Events

July 23, 2020 | UCSC Molecular Diagnostic Lab | Tales from a pandemic pop-up lab with Isabel Bjork, Jeremy Sanford, Olena Vaske, and Michael Stone (recording)

July 17, 2020 | UCSC University Forum: The Lessons of COVID for Global and Community Health with Nancy Chen and Matt Sparke (recording)

July 1, 2020 | COVID-19: The scientific basis for what we know (and don’t!) and the exit strategy it provides with Marm Kilpatrick (recording)

June 22, 2020 | University Forum: Solidarity Economics for the Coronavirus Crisis & Beyond with Chris Benner (recording)

June 17, 2020 | The Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Energy and Commerce | Health Care Inequality: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in COVID-19 and the Health Care System (recording)

May 28, 2020 | American Medical Association (AMA) | Prioritizing Equity: The Root Cause (recording)

May 27, 2020 |UC Santa Cruz Institute for Social Transformation | The Coronavirus Crisis and Social Change: Flash Talks on Social and Economic Dimensions of the COVID-19 Pandemic | Moderated by Dean Katharyne Mitchell (registration)

May 26, 2020 | UC San Diego Health | Lessons Learned: Ramping Up Telehealth Services During COVID-19 | Presented by Lawrence Friedman, Kristian Kidholm, Micaela Monteiro, and Lisa Moore (recording)

May 22, 2020 | UC Santa Cruz Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology | COVID-19: The Scientific Basis for What We Know and the Exit Strategy it Provides | Hosted by Infectious Disease Expert Marm Kilpatrick (recording)

May 14, 2020 | UC Santa Cruz  Institute for Social Transformation and UC Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative| Webinar: Health Care Access, Service Delivery, and Youth Civic Engagement in the Central Valley during the COVID-19 Pandemic (recording)

May 8 – 9, 2020 | Princeton University| Pandemic, Creating a Usable Past: Epidemic History, COVID-19, and the Future of Health. | Sponsored by the American Association for the History of Medicine (AAHM) with support from Princeton University, Department of History (recording)

May 6, 2020 | UC Santa Cruz COVID-19 Team | Guy Kawaski’s Fireside Chat With UCSC Coronavirus Team | Presented by Guy Kawasaki, David Haussler, Rebecca DuBois, John MacMillan, Jeremy Sanford | Supported by UCSC’s Genomics Institute (podcast recording)

May 6, 2020 | UCSC Right Livelihood College | Water Justice in the Age of Coronavirus and Beyond | Presented by Maude Barlow (Canada), Robert Bilott (USA), and Andy Szasz (USA, moderator) (recording)

April 29, 2020 | UCSC Right Livelihood College | Women in Global Health – COVID spotlight on major challenges with Laureates Monika Hauser (Germany), Sima Samar (Afghanistan), Evan Zillén (Sweden). Moderated by Professor Nancy Chen (UCSC, Anthropology) (recording)

April 28, 2020 | UC Santa Cruz Kraw Lecture Series | Viruses & Vaccines with Rebecca DuBois (recording)

April 28, 2020 | Duke University | COVID-19 Seminar #1 with Professor Priscilla Wald on the Outbreak Narrative and Why We Need to Change the Story | Co-hosted by the Alfred Deakin Institue for Citizenship & Globalisation (ADI) and the Science and Society Network (SSN)

April 24, 2020 | Virginia Tech STS Program | STS Approaches to COVID-19: A Roundtable Discussion | (recording)

April 24, 2020 | UC Berkeley | Straight Talk: A Conversation about Racism, Health Inequities, and COVID-19 (recording)

April 20, 2020 | UNESCO | Inclusion in the time of COVID-19: International webinar addressing racism, discrimination and exclusion [we will look for a link to the recording]

April 16, 2020 | UC Davis DHI | The Geopolitics of COVID-19: Mike Davis in Conversation with Joshua Clover (recording)

April 15, 2020 | Hutchins Center for African & African American Research Project on Race & Gender in Science & Medicine, Harvard | Epidemics and African American Communities Series: from 1792 to the Present | recordings: April 15 part 1, April 21 part 2, April 23 part 3, May 6 part 4

April 7, 2020 | Global Views on COVID 19: Lessons from the 1918 Flu Pandemic in India and Indonesia | (registration)

April 1, 2020 | Intersectionality Matters with Kimberlé Crenshaw |  Age Against the Machine: The Fatal Intersection of Racism & Ageism In the Time of Coronavirus (recording)

April 1, 2020 | The National Academy of Medicine and the American Public Health Association| The Science of Social Distancing, Part 2 (recording)

March 25, 2020 | Intersectionality Matters with Kimberlé Crenshaw | Under The Blacklight: The Intersectional Failures that COVID Lays Bare, Part 1 (recording)

March 25, 2020 | The National Academy of Medicine and the American Public Health Association | The Science of Social Distancing: Part 1 (recording)

C-Span | State and Federal Covid-19 Briefings and Legislative Deliberation | (recordings)

June 05, 2020 | UCHRI The Fire This Time: Race at Boiling Point

Hosted by David Theo Goldberg and UCHRI on Friday, June 05, 2020.

UCHRI gathered Angela Y. Davis (Emerita, UC Santa Cruz), Herman Gray (Emeritus, UC Santa Cruz), Gaye Theresa Johnson (UC Los Angeles), Robin D.G. Kelley (UC Los Angeles), and Josh Kun (USC) to think differently together about the structural conditions and explosive events shattering our times.

In a wide-ranging conversation emerging out of the national and international protests in response to yet another spate of anti-Black police violence, these leading critical thinkers engage questions about intersectional and international struggle, the militarization of the border, racial capitalism, the feminist dimension of new social justice movements, the unsustainability of the nation-state, the power of the arts as a rallying force for imagining and sustaining solidarities, and much more.

Rapporteur Report by Dennis Browe (PhD Student, Sociology, UC Santa Cruz)

Moderator

Herman Gray (Professor Emeritus, Sociology; SJRC Advisor, UC Santa Cruz)

Participants

Angela Y. Davis (Distinguished Professor Emerita, History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz)

Gaye Theresa Johnson (Associate Professor, African American Studies, UC Los Angeles)

Robin D. G. Kelley (Professor, African American Studies, UC Los Angeles)

Josh Kun (Professor and Chair, Cross-Cultural Communication; Director, School of Communication, University of Southern California)

The Fire This Time: Race at the Boiling Point (recording), which took place on June 5, 2020, brought together a superb collection of scholars to think together about this powerful moment – a confluence of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ‘fed up’-risings against police brutality and systemic racism taking place across the U.S. and globally. Hosted by the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI), over 9,000 people joined, indicating the energy of the moment and the hunger that so many have for real change and more justice both in the U.S. and abroad.

David Theo Goldberg, director of UCHRI, introduced the event and set the tone by noting the pain but also the hope engendering the circumstances of this necessary conversation. Dr. Goldberg also acknowledged the UC Santa Cruz wildcat strike and larger UC graduate student struggle for secure living wages still taking place, linking the militarized police suppression of the strikes across numerous UC campuses (though especially the UCSC picket line) to the police repression we are seeing on the streets across the U.S. today. Directly connecting the COLA movement with the reason for this event, he stated: “The impacts [of disciplinary measures taken by administration] have fallen especially hard on students and faculty of color.”

Herman Gray served as the moderator of the panel. Repeating a powerful Black Lives Matter mantra, he began by individually naming those most recently killed by police: “Of course, we are here because of the public lynching of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and David McAtee.” Much of the conversation centered around the transformative power of this moment and the types of hope that have been opened up. Panelists used a number of metaphors and analogies, borrowing other scholars’ words to describe these affective openings in the body politic. Gray relayed Antonio Gramsci’s phrase “the pessimism of the intellect and the optimism of the will” to speak about opportunity in crisis, while Stuart Hall’s notion of this being a truly ‘conjunctural moment,’ full of possibilities, was also invoked. Additionally, Angela Davis mentioned Arundhati Roy’s recent writing on the novel coronavirus as a ‘portal’ that can lead to something new, something different.

Gray then pulled on the polyvalent slogan, “I can’t breathe” to link together a number of intersecting structural conditions that harm Black and Brown people. These conditions literally affect their ability to breathe, while breath also metaphorically stands in for conditions of the measure of the good life. First, it is often poorer Black and Brown communities that have to live near polluted environments and polluted air. Second, the devastating health impacts of COVID-19 are hitting Black and Brown communities the hardest – importantly, not due to ‘racial’ genetics but due to structural racial inequalities, such as socioeconomic status and living in dense, low-income housing. And third, this phrase has been engrained into national consciousness by a number of Black men – Eric Garner and George Floyd as just the two most well-known names – who whispered these final words through their constricted airways under the weight of police chokeholds and knee-holds. “I can’t breathe” captures this confluence of structural conditions that for Gray opens a space to think through this moment and the possibilities for real change. 

The panelists recognized that, while powerful, ultimately this hopeful moment will not last, and a main question becomes what people can do next, how to move in the direction of a better future. Gaye Theresa Johnson offered keen insight here by saying that when people ask what we can do next, they are thinking within institutions; instead, what we need is a fundamental shift around our notion that what we need is a leader (usually a man) to tell us what to do and where to go next. She stated: “we need to start doing this ourselves,” by starting conversations and sometimes simply listening to and supporting the people already doing this work. Johnson remarked on signs of hope coming from these uprisings: they are teaching us “a different kind of calculus of human worth,” one predicated on the inherent humanity of Black and Brown people, who deserve to be here simply because they are breathing, able to draw breath. The suffering, she said, of Black and Brown and trans people, is met with skepticism, putting the burden of proof on them over and over again in order to have to prove their humanity. However, it is through and in struggle that “we always have the lessons of what we need in order to become free.” Davis also referenced the 2015 uprisings against white supremacy at the University of Missouri, reminding us that while the intensity of that powerful moment did die down, it is vital to not lose sight of the openings created for systemic change, even if it is difficult to not see immediate results.

Robin D.G. Kelley noted that there has long been an ongoing war that preceded COVID-19 – a war against poor Black and Brown communities which includes preexisting conditions of racism and structural inequalities. Referencing Cedric Robinson – his teacher and teacher to many on the contours of racial capitalism – Dr. Kelley linked together a number of phenomena into this ongoing war: exacerbation of border closings and horrible conditions of immigrant detention centers; bypassing of labor laws by Amazon, Instacart, and other gig workers; the deeply unsafe conditions of working in the meatpacking industry; as well as the growth of authoritarian regimes all over the world. These interlinked phenomena are manifesting in the unequal effects of COVID-19 and this most recent set of murders by law enforcement, all laying bare the intensity and the possibilities of the current struggle to live collectively. As Jenny Reardon, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Science & Justice Research Center at UC Santa Cruz, argues in a recent essay, it is veracity – ‘trustworthy truths’ – that is required to help imagine and create a more just world, centered around recognizing our collective relations with others.

Josh Kun picked up on this thread, discussing the militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border by highlighting the converging effects of policing Black and Brown bodies in this country, including how Homeland Security and ICE have become further integrated into domestic functions of policing (even as far back as 1992, the U.S. Border Patrol was used in Los Angeles to ‘clean up the streets’ and deport Latinos). Kun then discussed his work following Richard Misrach, an influential photographer who documented the militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border during the Obama administration. Misrach found all sorts of white supremacist spray paint messaging across the border rocks: “These linked systems of hate and terror are actually written on the walls, written on the landscape and on the land that has been stolen.” While the fear and hatred of Latinx immigrants is so palpable for many in this country, Kun took this opportunity to remark that the strong networking of how domination and violence happens needs to be met with the same level of resistance networking, the same level of strength of convergence and coalition-building.

After the initial round of commentary, the conversation turned to the importance of a global perspective and the need to confront ongoing racial capitalism since, as Angela Davis reminded us, racism is not just a domestic problem. Importantly, the importance of a broad internationalist, solidarity-based perspective turns on the need for awareness of the limitations of the nation-state. The panelists all seemed to agree that, as Davis stated, “the nation-state as we know it is no longer possible.” The liberal nation-state, which, even with its short history in the U.S. (Kelley remarked that the social-democratic liberal U.S. state only appeared during Reconstruction and did not last long) has been hollowed out and dominated by market-based, neoliberal ideology. For the panelists, this is where the authoritarian regimes come in to maintain control of the nation-state – capital still needs to be allowed to freely cross borders, but these regimes use nationalist surges and fear tactics to gain followers. Johnson remarked how these authoritarian nationalist surges are not just a demonstration of power but are also a measure of white supremacy’s fragility. She pointed to a material metaphor to symbolize this white fragility by noting the flimsy chain-link fence that has been put up around the White House to keep protestors out: “It’s the narrative, the gesture that you are not welcome, this is our house. But it’s a permeable chain-link fence, it’s not going to keep anybody out or in.”

The internationalist movement that has exploded across the globe is laying bare this white supremacist fragility, and the beauty of this new movement (which builds on but goes beyond work done by Occupy and on Black Lives Matter struggles over the past decade) is that is a coalescence of contesting anti-Black and anti-Brown state violence. Davis noted that when we say ‘abolish prisons’ and ‘abolish the police,’ we are thinking about a future in which we have moved beyond the bourgeois notion of the nation-state (which is constitutively anti-Black). Johnson beautifully remarked that the nation-state does not, and cannot, “hold all of the dreams and imaginings that we have for our communities, that we have in our own time… we have our own ideas about what freedom is…We are so infuriating to the authoritarian fascists because [we call] their bluff. We refuse their world because we have a whole different set of imaginaries that they cannot even comprehend, and these are ready to be enacted.”

Gray, in a way linking these alternate imaginaries of another world to the question of care – of taking care of one another in the streets through mobilization and protest – noted that this has been an essential element of these uprisings. Davis responded by asking, “Who usually does the care?,” conveying the importance of recognizing the feminist dimension of these new movements. Kelley then echoed a critique being made often this past month: why do police have all the equipment they need, but healthcare workers cannot get enough personal protective equipment (PPE)? This discrepancy speaks to the overfunding of the masculine-imperialist police force and the underfunding of more feminized healthcare work. 

After Kun’s discussion of the importance of cell phone video footage of racialized police brutality as producing a ‘new archive of truth,’ Gray introduced questions from the audience, covering topics including building multi-racial coalitions and organizing; the small-scale steps that people can take as well as what changes institutions need to make; and COVID-19’s economy of violence whereby we are seeing a shutdown of the economy and hundreds of thousands of deaths at the same time that there has been a massive distribution of wealth to the super wealthy. Panelists discussed structural issues that have become exacerbated during the pandemic such as the privatization of healthcare and the mainstreaming of corporate care about issues of anti-Blackness (See, for example, statements put out by Coca Cola and by 23andMe; as well as UC Press’s statement supporting Black Lives Matter). Kun highlighted how corporate maneuvers, which put out public, surface-level statements supporting Black Lives Matter while changing none of their own policies which contribute to racial inequalities amongst their workers, can actually increase capital accumulation on the backs of Black people.                                                                                         

The final part of the conversation revolved around the power of music and visual art as part of freedom struggles. Especially in this moment of isolation from COVID-19 quarantine as it has run up against the uprisings, the sonic dimension of sociality has become even more important. Davis remarked how one of the reasons why people all over the world are drawn to the Black struggle in the U.S. has to do with the power of Black music: along with the Black music that has traveled have been the stories of Black resistance. And this, she thinks, is one of the reasons why there is not nearly the same level of global solidarity with other freedom struggles such as of the Palestinians and Kurds. However, music has the power to open up solidarities across struggles.

Fittingly, this past January the Science & Justice Research Center (SJRC) co-hosted an event on the future of race in the U.S. (which was a conversation between Herman Gray and Alondra Nelson, with Jenny Reardon serving as moderator); the ongoing theme of that conversation centered around how to realize and create conditions of possibility for transformative social moments/movements. And now, just five months later, a massively transformative moment has arrived in full force, opening up new possibilities for taking action centered around a more expansive notion of freedom and for thinking about what work remains ahead.

I end with a comment from Kelley, based on an audience question asking how to reconcile two timelines of freedom: the freedom enshrined in the U.S. Constitution on the one hand, and on the other hand the fact that many groups such as Blacks still do not have that full freedom. He replied by remarking that these are not two separate timelines, since they are dialectically related. One freedom is dependent on the other: unfreedom. For whites in the U.S., their freedom has always depended on the unfreedom of others. Taking in and digesting the wisdom of these scholars pushes us to continue thinking through this powerful moment, envisioning how to build more livable presents and more just futures. Since freedoms are dialectically interdependent, this moment, however short-lived, offers a chance to think and act our way out of the differentially deadly contours of racial capitalism, imagining life-giving alternatives to the conditions of anti-Blackness that can transmute “I can’t breathe” into something like “We breathe better, beautifully together.” This will take massive work on a broad internationalist scale and is prone to opposition and counter-forces at every step along the way, but as this conversation showed, this moment of transformation is already here as an ongoing new beginning.

Fall Science & Justice Writing Together

Wanting to establish a regular writing routine exploring science and justice? Join SJRC scholars for open writing sessions! Engage in six 25-minute writing sessions (with a 5 minute break in between). Open to all students, faculty, researchers, staff, and visiting scholars.

We will continue to schedule quarterly writing sessions based on interest and availability. For more information or to express interest (including days/times of the week that work for you), please contact SJRC Graduate Student Researcher Dennis Browe (sociology).

October 14, 2020 | Meet & Greet

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

4:00-5:30 PM

Zoom Registration

Please join us for a beginning of quarter social hour. In addition to a chance to celebrate the new academic year and enjoy each other’s company, we will welcome new members of our community, and welcome back others.

This will be a great chance for everyone to meet and foster emerging collaborations! Attendees are highly encouraged to bring and share their objects of study as it is a fun and helpful way to find intersecting areas of interest.

Faculty interested in science and justice who want to learn more about SJRC, or would like to affiliate with Science & Justice are highly encouraged to join us.

COVID-19 Pandemicene Zine

Students in Director Jenny Reardon’s undergraduate independent study seminar, SOCY 194: Living and Learning in a Pandemic: The Sociology of COVID-19, have co-created a zine based on everyone’s unique quarantine experiences and interests in understanding local responses to the pandemic!

Full design credit and our special thanks go to Kathia Damian (Literature)!

 

COVID-19 Blogs

Here, four students in our internship which ran parallel to the course, share their series of blog posts, which each focus on a different issue and angle concerning COVID-19. Initial posts were posted on May 13, 2020, with further posts in the series to come.

Maryam Nazir – Bioethics and Equity-Based Frameworks Amidst a Pandemic; Reconciling the Irreconcilable Disparities in the Healthcare Industry

Kathia Damian – Privacy During a Pandemic: Digital Contact Tracing and Technosolutionism; Exposure Notifications, Digital Contact Tracing, and the Burden of Responsibility

Teresa (Tee) Wicks – The Global Medical Supply Chain, Neoliberalism, and COVID-19; Pharmaceuticals, a Vaccine for COVID-19, and Questions of Equitable Access; An Intersectional Narrative of Two Epidemics

Isa Ansari – COVID-19 Conversations with Dr. Kim TallBear and Dr. Jessica Kolopenuk; Re-Worlding in the time of COVID with Mesiah and Little Wind

 

Additional Pandemicene Project Information

Find more information on the COVID-19 Pandemicene’s project page.

The SJRC has a robust network of local and international public health experts, scholars, and practitioners leading the way with collecting resources for teaching about COVID-19, writing open response letters, and calls to action, and organizing and participating in online events.

Call for Participation

Spring 2020 Undergraduate Student Researcher Opportunity

The Science & Justice Research Center is pleased to announce we are now accepting applications for a:

Undergraduate Research Fellowship

The award presents a paid research opportunity to first-generation, low income, under-represented groups, undocumented, and/or former foster youth. The award is intended as a stipend to support general living expenses, fieldwork or travel (as allowed by campus or state COVID-19 and shelter-in-place restrictions), presentation of work, and/or research. Undergraduate students currently enrolled in any department at UC Santa Cruz may apply. Preference will be given to applicants currently involved in the project. Established to increase inclusiveness and a sense of belonging in research, the award will support research conducted by one undergraduate student working with the Center project:

Theorizing Race After Race

The student should:
  • Be currently enrolled as an undergraduate student (any department) at UC Santa Cruz during Spring 2020; summer enrollment is not required.
  • Be currently working on the established Center project: Theorizing Race After Race.
The student will:
  • Help design and articulate the project’s future. This may include conducting interviews and transcription, analysis and editing of interviews; as well as tracking, collecting, and organizing articles about the social, political, and economic dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic written by prominent theorists of race, inequality, and STS.
  • Adhere to IRB standards for working with human research subjects if applicable.
  • Be offered a $1,500 Fellowship with the SJRC and listed on the Project’s webpage.
To Apply:

By 12:00Noon, Wed May 13, students should email (scijust@ucsc.edu) expressing interest, letting us know and sending the following:

  1. Your name, major, academic faculty advisor(s).
  2. Your resume/CV.
  3. Why you are interested in the project, how your personal/work/research/career goals would benefit from the fellowship, and how it would contribute to your overall sense of belonging at UC Santa Cruz.
  4. A short statement on your experiences at UCSC or involvement with the SJRC as related to topics addressed by the Project (including human subjects research, events attended, classes taken, etc.).
  5. Any ideas briefly describing potential research to be completed over Spring and Summer 2020.

Information on SJRC’s TRAR project can be found at: https://scijust.ucsc.edu/2018/11/27/theorizing-race-after-race/