Oct 11 | Meet & Greet

Please join us for a beginning of quarter social hour. In addition to a chance to celebrate the new academic year and enjoy each other’s company over nice food and drink, we will be welcoming new members of our community, and welcoming back others.

This will be a great chance for everyone to meet the new faces in the Center and foster emerging collaborations!

 

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 | 4:00-5:30 PM | SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231

book

Call for Undergraduate Individual Study (2017-2018)

 

The SJRC will host up to 4 Individual Study students to collaborate on research papers and proposals as well as Center events and programming for the academic year. Students can also work on senior thesis projects related to Center Themes (Genomics, Data Justice, Climate Justice) and/or assist SJRC Graduate Training Program Fellows in planning and organizing events. The Individual Study course, can range from 2-5 units, be independent or group and will include directed readings, guided independent and collaborative research and project planning.

Interested in the Intersections of Science and Justice?

Want to Develop Collaborative Research or Public Events?

 

Available Fall 2017

Telling the Story of Science & Justice: Individual Study with SJRC

SJRC regularly documents our events in written form, and writes digests of events for non-academic audiences. This student would assist documenting Science & Justice events, taking detailed notes during the events, recording brief interviews conducted with guests and participants, and producing creative short pieces that publicize the Center and demonstrate the importance of our mission. The student will develop a portfolio demonstrating their ability to produce short, engaging videos and web content that publicize and further an organization’s mission.

Please contact Kate Darling kdarling@ucsc.edu by October 17th.

 

Find ways undergraduates can get involved in Science and Justice research. Apply no later than the Monday of Week 1 and email a writing sample to scijust@ucsc.edu.

Fall | Science and Justice Writing Together

Wanting to establish a regular writing routine exploring science and justice? Join SJRC scholars Wednesday mornings from 9:00am-12:00pm in the SJRC Common Room beginning Oct 4th through Dec 5th for open writing sessions! Engage in six 25-minute writing sessions (with a 5 minute break in between).

Open to all SJRC graduate students, faculty and visiting scholars. We will schedule writing sessions on a quarterly basis based on interest and availability, please be in touch if you are interested in participating in the future but cannot participate on Wednesdays during Fall quarter.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Dillon (Assistant Professor of Sociology).

 

Wednesdays (fall term) | 9:00 AM -12:00 PM | SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231

Oct 03 | Epigenetics, Trauma, and Restorative Justice

Post-genomic scientific research practices are shifting conceptualizations of the relationships between bodies & environments over human lifetimes and generations (Lappé & Landecker 2015; Darling et al. 2016). Epigenetics has recently generated a set of frameworks & methods for linking environmental & social exposures to molecular effects. Ruth Müller and Martha Kenney are investigating how the narratives about early life adversity coming out of environmental epigenetics circulate in the life sciences and in wider publics (Kenney & Müller, 2017).

In their recent article “Of Rats and Women: Narratives of Motherhood in Environmental Epigenetics,” they identify troubling trends in how the results of these experiments are narrated, specifically how trauma and early life adversity are often framed as causing potentially-irreversible life-long damage.

In this experimental mixer, they will join SJRC Assistant Director Kate Weatherford Darling and S&J visitor Kim Hendrickx in dialogue about their current research project that investigates how research from epigenetics and neurobiology is currently taken up by restorative justice and trauma-informed care practitioners. They ask: How do their models of trauma differ from those of life scientists? How are biological frameworks enrolled in the context of restorative justice events and trainings? How can narratives emerging from restorative justice and trauma-informed care contribute important perspectives to research in the life sciences?

 

Ruth Müller is an STS researcher with degrees in Molecular Biology (MSc) and Sociology (PhD). Her research explores the nexus of science, technology & policy with a focus on the sociology and epistemology of the life sciences. She is Assistant Professor of Science & Technology Policy at Technical University of Munich. https://www.mcts.tum.de/en/personen/professuren/ruth-mueller/

Martha Kenney (PhD History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz) is a feminist science studies scholar whose research explores the poetics and politics of biological storytelling. She is Assistant Professor in the Department of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University. https://wgsdept.sfsu.edu/people/25283/martha-kenney

 

October 03, 2017 | 10:00-11:30 AM  | SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231

A small farm in the Andean-Amazonian foothills of Colombia. Photo by Kristina Lyons.

Society for Cultural Anthropology Honors S&J’s Kristina Lyons and Anna Tsing

The Society for Cultural Anthropology has awarded UCSC Assistant Professor and S&J Steering Committee member Kristina Lyons (Feminist Science Studies) the 2017 Cultural Horizons Prize for her article “Decomposition as Life Politics: Soils, Selva, and Small Farmers under the Gun of the U.S.–Colombia War on Drugs,” which appeared in Cultural Anthropology 31, no. 1 (2016): 56–81.

Stating, “This is not an ethnographic enterprise in which the objects of inquiry are slotted into narrow disciplinary agendas, but rather an exercise in accounting for and responding to when the material suggests, even demands, theoretical jumps.”

Find more information on Lyons’ community call to action to bring relief aid for Mocoa following the devastating natural disasters earlier this year.

Receiving honorable mention was UCSC Professor Anna Tsing (Anthropology) along with UCSC graduate student Isabelle Carbonell (Film & Digital Media), Joelle Chevrier (Land Dyke Feminist Family Farm) and Yen-Ling Tsai (National Chiao Tung University) for their article “Golden Snail Opera: The More-than-Human Performance of Friendly Farming on Taiwan’s Lanyang Plain,” which appeared in Cultural Anthropology 31, no. 4 (2016): 520–44.

Find the full award announcement at 2017 Cultural Horizons Prize.

Person with long brown hair in a pink dress smelling flowers in a rooftop vegetable garden overlooking a luscious green city scape with windmills and skyrail

Call for Papers | Imaginactivism: A Speculative Fiction Workshop on Environmental Justice, Flourishing and Cohabitation

Expressions of interest by: September 29, 2017

Person with long brown hair in a pink dress smelling flowers in a rooftop vegetable garden overlooking a luscious green city scape with windmills and skyrail

Concept art by Jessica Perlstein representing San Francisco as described in Starhawk's The Fifth Sacred Thing.

Deadline for submissions: October 2, 2017

Workshop: October 18, 2017 (1:00 -4:00PM, DARC Light Lab)

Organization: UCSC Science and Justice Research Center

Contact email: jharan@uoregon.edu and cmasseng@ucsc.edu

In this workshop we will take inspiration from Starhawk and Donna Haraway.

In their writings since the later 1970s we can trace both the influence of a web of feminist SFs, including speculative fiction, science fiction and speculative fabulation, and their own crafting of SF. They are both authors of feminist SF; most explicitly with Starhawk’s The Fifth Sacred Thing (1993) and its sequel City of Refuge (2015) and Haraway’s “The Camille Stories” (2016) but also implicitly in their work on movement-building and figuration. They use SF not to conjure purified alternatives or forms of escape, but to remain embedded in and accountable to the world. The workshop will focus on this mode of SF and their insistence on accounting for compromised and difficult relationality, shared responsibility and non-innocence.

Their work emerges from and reiterates the collective call to action issued by intersecting social movements.  They focus on hope and possibility without downplaying the scale of the various crises we face, including climate change, mass extinctions, and the concentration of wealth and power in the hands of a few. They locate their work explicitly in both the local and the global, and draw on deep experiential knowledge of their chosen dwelling-places as well as research on, and dialogues with, dwellers from elsewhere. In drawing inspiration from these structural links across their use of SF, the workshop aims to provide a platform for thinking about our collective responsibility to reshape our modes of being if we are to hold open the possibility of flourishing to future generations of humans and more-than-humans.

For this workshop, we invite feminist, queer, antiracist, and decolonial STS scholars and activists working on environmental and racial justice to experiment with the possibilities of speculative and visionary storytelling. All participants will submit a short piece of work (by October 2nd) which will be circulated to other workshop participants for reading ahead of the workshop. If you’ve never done creative writing before, do not worry!  We are looking for messy and promising provocations, not polished manuscripts. Please reserve your place by emailing jharan@uoregon.edu and cmasseng@ucsc.edu by 09/29/17.

You are asked to submit 900 words of speculative fiction[ii] (by 10/02/17) about a place that is particularly meaningful to you.  You might conjure up its future, produce a speculative and disruptive history or trace the contours of an alternate present. Who and what have (had) attachments to that place, and how are those attachments bound up in larger networks of interrelationship? Do those attachments open up ways of imagining flourishing cohabitation (however you conceive of that), or do those attachments need to be disconnected and / or reconnected to create spaces of possibility?

[i] Imaginactivism is a compound word coined (Haran 2015) to denote the entangled relationship of imagination and activism. One of key questions rasised by the Imaginactivism research project is: how are interpretive / activist communities or networks formed, inspired and / or restored or reinvigorated by fictional cultural production? This workshop is one attempt to explore this question collectively.

[ii] If you work with graphic fiction or other speculative genres and are interested in participating in the workshop, please contact jharan@uoregon.edu to express your interest and to suggest alternative materials to submit.

May 18-19 | Environmentalism Outside the Box: An Ecosex Symposium

Flyer for Environmentalism Outside the Box: An Ecosex Symposium

Environmentalism Outside the Box: An Ecosex Symposium

A multi-disciplinary gathering to explore our relationships with the environment and social justice, engage in human/non-human collaboration, critique ideologies and debate new sexualities. Let’s examine where our “bodies” end and “nature” begins. What happens when we posit the Earth as our lover?

Schedule to include keynotes by Kim TallBear (Professor of Indigenous Studies, University of Alberta) on Decolonizing Settler Sexuality and Chris Cuomo (Professor from University of Georgia) on Race and Environmentalism, a post screening conversation with Donna Haraway following feature film Story Telling for Earthly Survival and panel discussions with Joe Dumit (Professor of Anthropology and Chair of Performance Studies, UC Davis), Beth Stephens (Professor of Art, UCSC), Lisa Rofel (Professor of Anthropology, UCSC) and Cleo Woelfle-Erskine (S&J UC President’s Postdoctoral fellow).

Symposium is free. Parking is $4.

See schedule at https://earthlab.ucsc.edu/ecosex-symposium/

 

May 18-19, 2017 | All Day | Digital Arts Research Center, DARC 108

May 10 | CRISPR Cas9 and Justice

Sponsored by the CRISPR User Group, SJRC Director Jenny Reardon (Professor of Sociology) will present a talk, to divert our gaze from the spectacular—we will cut out deadly genes; we will fundamentally alter the human species—to focus on the more mundane, but more profound changes of which CRISPR technologies are apart—changes that that call into question how we live and know today.

Rather than a threat to the future of humanity or life on earth, Reardon will argue that CRISPR helps make visible these more fundamental transformations in modes of knowing and governing.

Pizza will be provided.

 

May 10, 2017 |12Noon-1:00PM | Biomed 200

May 9 | Telling the Truth: Objectivity and Justice

Illustration of the world melting

The terms “post-fact”, “post-truth”, and “post-reality” are now being used to label the new era we have entered. We are already seeing the erasure of climate data from servers and websites, and purveyors of the truth, including climate scientists, journalists, and academics are being put on warning. (The Climate Scientists witch-hunt and the Professor Watchlist are just two of many indicators). Data refuge efforts are underway amid concerns that the incoming administration will wage a war on scientific expertise.

At the same time that it is of upmost importance that facts, truth, and reality be asserted to counter the normalization of lies and fake news used to obscure the truth and manipulate the public, there is a large body of scholarship showing the non-innocent and often times harmful use of these terms in ways that collude with the forces of power, including colonialism, racism, militarism, etc.

We have created this research cluster to help us think through these issues during these extraordinary times.

Convened by Karen Barad, the research cluster met throughout the winter and spring quarters and proved to be quite generative. During our first meeting we talked about what the terms ‘fact’, ‘truth’, and ‘reality’ signal to each of us. At our second meeting we had a wonderful discussion of the last chapter of Hannah Arendt’s Origins of Totalitarianism and we came up with some different approaches we might useful take in moving forward. For our third meeting we read and discussed Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower. For our fourth meeting we discussed the film classic “Inherit the Wind,” and talked about the science march, and continued our discussion of possible interventions.

Science & Justice invites you to our fifth and final meeting of this academic school year on Tuesday May 9th 4:00-5:30pm. We will begin with a discussion of Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Talents. Even if you don’t have time to read the novel you are welcome to join us. And as always there will be snacks!

May 9, 2017 | 4:00-5:30 PM | SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231