Winter | Science and Justice Writing Together

Mondays | 1:00-4:00pm | SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231

Wanting to establish a regular writing routine exploring science and justice? Join SJRC scholars in the SJRC Common Room for open writing sessions! Engage in six 25-minute writing sessions (with a 5 minute break in between).

Open to all students, faculty and visiting scholars. We will continue to schedule writing sessions on a quarterly basis based on interest and availability, please be in touch if you are interested in participating in the future.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Dillon (Assistant Professor of Sociology).

Feb 28 | Giving Day

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

ALL DAY – ONLINE

Join SJRC on February 28th for the third annual UC Santa Cruz Giving Day!

Giving Day is a 24-hour online fundraising campaign where we will raise funds for undergraduate researchers.

Your support creates a vibrant future for science and justice researchers. With your help, we can offer summer support for student research, allowing both undergraduate and graduate students interested in questions of science and justice to extend their projects beyond the normal confines of the academic year. This will both bolster their training and research experience and grow SJRC’s ability to make a difference in these crucial social issues of health, science, and justice.

Thank you for making a more just world possible!

Visit our Giving Day project campaign to learn more!

Mar 09 | Lesley Green with Anthropology

Friday, March 09, 2018

12:00-1:30 PM

Location: TBD

More information soon.

Event Organizer: Kristina Lyons

Lesley Green | Fulbright Fellow, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Cape Town; Director of Environmental Humanities South, Faculty of Humanities, University of Cape Town

Hosted by the Anthropology Department.

Co-Sponsored by the Science and Justice Research Center

Mar 14 | Reflexivity Isn’t Enough: (Re)Making ‘Place’ in Ethnographic Practices

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

4:00-5:30 PM

SJRC Common Room

This presentation consists of two parts. First, Hernández will present a talk that draws on their forthcoming journal publication which narrates an embodied and experiential ethnographic approach, one that reimagines ethnography and ethnographic practices, and works to contribute to healing and Indigenous survivance.

Second, Hernández, who is a Society for Visual Anthropology awardee, will conduct a reading of their ethnographic poetry while inviting bees into the space with the help of photo-ethnography. Hernández’s dissertation work is a relational collaboration with bees, among many more-than-human beings, in and with the borderlands of California and Arizona. Thus, bees and the Indigenous lands from where they live and from which they come will be present and honored through both visual and poetic engagements.

Krisha J. Hernández (Mexica/Aztec, Yaqui (Yoeme), & Bisayan), is an Indígena Ph.D. Candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). Hernández is the recipient of fellowships from the National Science Foundation, UCSC Graduate Division, UCSC Science and Justice Research Center, and is a Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate and Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholar. She is a researcher in the Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) international research and teaching hub lab chaired by Canada’s Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience, and Environment, Dr. Kim TallBear. Her forthcoming dissertation, “Agents of Pollination: Indigenous Bodies & Lives, and U.S. Agriculture Technosciences,” is concerned with Indigeneity and materialisms, (de)colonization and settler colonialism, and collaboration (with more-than-(but including)-human beings) as healing. Hernández researches human-insect relations in food and agricultural systems, more-than-human socialites, foodways, and environmental change in which they employ a critical Indigenous feminist lens toward more-than-human personhood.  Hernández has had the privilege of working as an invited guest on Kānaka Maoli land, and currently works and thinks with desert lands and pollinators in the southern ‘borderlands’ of California and Arizona— primarily in relational collaboration with bees and moths.

 

May 1 | Reading Group with Lesley Green

Tuesday, May 01, 2018

11:30-1:30 PM

Location: TBD

More information soon.

Event Organizer: Kristina Lyons

Lesley Green | Fulbright Fellow, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Cape Town; Director of Environmental Humanities South, Faculty of Humanities, University of Cape Town

Hosted by the IHR Race, Violence, Inequality and the Anthropocene Cluster.

Co-Sponsored by the Science and Justice Research Center

May 2 | Lesley Green with the IHR Race, Violence, Inequality and the Anthropocene Cluster

Wednesday, May 02, 2018

3:00-5:00 PM

Location: TBD

More information soon.

Event Organizer: Kristina Lyons

Lesley Green | Fulbright Fellow, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Cape Town; Director of Environmental Humanities South, Faculty of Humanities, University of Cape Town

Hosted by the IHR Race, Violence, Inequality and the Anthropocene Cluster.

Co-Sponsored by the Science and Justice Research Center

May 16 | Bioengineering in the Open

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

4:00-6:00 PM

Engineering 2, room 599

Bioengineering is an ascendant and elite field. Advocates of “open” bioengineering propose to expand the participants, methods and scope of practices & ideas for intervening in biology. Drawing on the perceived innovative successes of Silicon Valley, these advocates often promote analogies to computer and information technology to both frame and direct biological engineering’s development as a definitive technology of the twenty-first century. “Bioengineering in the Open” will explore the points of agreement and contention between different versions of “open” bioengineering, including what sources of inspiration and promise they find outside of biotechnology’s conventional borders.

Specifically, the event will compare the versions of “open” biotechnology espoused by a university-based bioengineer and a DIY biohacking collective. Drew Endy, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University, promotes the development of standardized biological engineering through the open-source Registry of Standard Biological Parts, working with biological systems to make them more “engineerable.” Oakland-based DIY “biohacking” and citizen science collective Counter Culture Labs compares the innovative powers of community laboratories to the garages that birthed many Silicon Valley startups and emphasizes “democratizing” and “demystifying” biotechnology by taking it outside the ivory towers of universities and research laboratories.

The Science and Justice Working Group will bring these advocates of different visions of “open” bioengineering together to discuss common concerns of innovation, accessibility, and intellectual property. Politics of openness in bioengineering have clear justice implications, as they present cases for who should be allowed to contribute to and benefit from the biology of the future. By shaping bioengineering in the image of computer and information technology, these political visions adopt some familiar models of participation and regulation. This raises some concerns, however: What lessons do these bioengineering advocates take from the less desirable features and outcomes—demographic inequality, monopoly, and information insecurity, for example—of the information technology industry? And does the push to equate biological engineering with computer engineering eclipse features that are unique to working with biomatter, like the ethics or risks of intervening in life forms that grow, mutate, and reproduce?

This working group event aims to discuss the following questions:

  • What ends (Knowledge production? Innovation? Profit? Ethics?) do advocates of “open bioengineering” expect it to better serve?
  • What does approaching biology as a form of engineering accomplish? What distinguishes “open,” as opposed to “closed,” engineering? What other analogies and metaphors do we have for developing and understanding biotechnology?
  • Who does “open” biotechnology help get involved and how? Who should have the right to participate in and benefit from bioengineering? What are the benefits that they receive from open biotechnology?
  • What are the risks and responsibilities of “open” bioengineering, and how are they distributed? How does “open bioengineering” anticipate and mitigate its own potential for harm?

Event Host:

Andy Murray, Sociology PhD Candidate and SJRC Graduate Student Researcher

Participants:

Drew Endy, Associate Professor, Stanford University

Patrik D’haeseleer, Co-founder and Chair, Counter Culture Labs

Jenny Reardon, Professor and SJRC Director, UCSC

 

Co-Sponsored by the UCSC Departments of Biomolecular Engineering; Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology

May 30 | WiSE’s Science on Tap | The Postgenomic Condition

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

7:00 PM

The Crepe Place: 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz, CA 95062

SJRC Director and Sociology Professor Jenny Reardon will discuss with us her new book, The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice & Knowledge After the Genome. Reardon’s research draws into focus questions about identity, justice and democracy that are often silently embedded in scientific ideas and practices, particularly in modern genomic research. Her training spans molecular biology, the history of biology, science studies, feminist and critical race studies, and the sociology of science, technology and medicine.

Science on Tap is designed to connect the Santa Cruz community to the latest research at U.C. Santa Cruz.  It is not exclusive for scientists and science majors and aims to appeal to all audiences. So come, grab a drink and meal, relax and hear some interesting cutting edge science that’s happening near you!

Science on Tap is generally on the last Wednesday of every month at the Crepe Place. Due to the popularity of these events, to ensure that you’ll have a seat, we highly recommend that you reserve a table by calling the Crepe Place at (831) 429-6994. More information can be found on their website at: http://thecrepeplace.com/.

Jenny Reardon is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the UC Santa Cruz.

 

Hosted by the UC Santa Cruz Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE).