Past Events

Cocktail Hour: Allen Thompson “Inter-generational Justice and Issues in Ecosystem Management”

Thompson discusses a growing field of ecological thought that concerns the increasing emergence of non-analog or “novel” ecosystems and the subsequent need to develop an “intervention” ecology to supplement historic management principles of non-intervention, arguing that an intervention ecology will be required to achieve our preservation and conservation goals in a new world of rapidly changing ecologies. Continue Reading Cocktail Hour: Allen Thompson “Inter-generational Justice and Issues in Ecosystem Management”

WiSE Winter Luncheon: Addressing Gender Bias in the Sciences

The Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) group is hosting a luncheon on gender bias in the sciences. Have you ever wondered how to recognize and/or deal with gender bias in STEM careers? Have you known people who have been biased against, but are unsure of how to help them? Are you afraid that you yourself might be biased? Are you interested in the status of women in STEM fields? Continue Reading WiSE Winter Luncheon: Addressing Gender Bias in the Sciences

Science and Justice in an Age of Big Data: Biomedical Privacy & Genomic Openness

On January 22, 2014, the Science & Justice Working Group is hosting the first in a series of ongoing conversations about the unresolved issues raised by the recent push to expand efforts to collect and aggregate biological samples and data. Jenny Reardon (Science & Justice Research Center Director and Associate Professor of Sociology) will facilitate a conversation between Peter Yu (incoming President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Director of Cancer Research (ASCO) at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation) and David Haussler (Director of the UCSC Center for Biomolecular Sciences and Engineering). Continue Reading Science and Justice in an Age of Big Data: Biomedical Privacy & Genomic Openness

Investigative Justice

Sally Lehrman speaks about what constitutes responsible practices of investigation in journalism, and what might we learn from and with journalism about the challenges of constituting responsible practices of investigation in science? Continue Reading Investigative Justice

Workshop: Transacademics: Making Use of Interdisciplinary Research Methods Outside of the Academy

Third Meeting of the Bay Area Intercampus Workshop on Interdisciplinarity This workshop will consider how interdisciplinary research methods and knowledges can be used outside of specialized academic venues, with a particular focus on the importance of collaboration. Scholars who are drawn to interdisciplinary inquiry are often in search of knowledge that has more purchase on… Continue Reading Workshop: Transacademics: Making Use of Interdisciplinary Research Methods Outside of the Academy

Thawing Justice?

Wednesday October 16, 2013 4:00-6:00PM Engineering 2, Room 599 Joanna Radin (Yale, Department of History)  will join us to discuss what happens when biological tissues in freezers take on different ethical meanings over time.  What are our responsibilities towards the life immortal?  Who is responsible?  At this session, we will also discuss the recent NIH… Continue Reading Thawing Justice?

When does science become justice? Scientific evidence, pesticides and food system justice

This panel brings together a social scientist, an activist organization, a natural scientist, and a pesticide regulator. Where we search for shared insights into the meeting of scientific knowledge and democratic governance of food systems, giving credence to the positions of the many stakeholders in food systems—farmers, workers, neighbors and eaters alike. Continue Reading When does science become justice? Scientific evidence, pesticides and food system justice

Putting Earthquake Prediction on Trial: Lessons from the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake

In October, 2012, seven Italian earthquake scientists were found guilty of manslaughter for their role in failing to communicate the risk of a possible earthquake, shortly before a powerful 2009 earthquake killed more than 300 people in the city of L’Aquila, Italy. In October, 2012, seven Italian earthquake scientists were found guilty of manslaughter for their role in failing to communicate the risk of a possible earthquake, shortly before a powerful 2009 earthquake killed more than 300 people in the city of L’Aquila, Italy. This trial has become an international cause celebre; in today’s event, Prof. Susan Schwartz (UCSC, Earth and Planetary Sciences) will discuss the current state of earthquake prediction and her experiences working in Costa Rica. Prof. Massimo Mazzotti, (UC Berkeley, History) will talk about the political and institutional context which led to the seven scientists’ being put on trial. Continue Reading Putting Earthquake Prediction on Trial: Lessons from the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake