Upcoming Events

April 20 | “No, Really, What Percentage are You?”: Genomics, Race, and Genetic Ancestry Testing

Saturday, April 20, 2019 1:00-5:00pm Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History (705 Front St. Santa Cruz) Free and open to the public; refreshments provided; no registration needed Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing services such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com are rapidly becoming a cultural touchstone, a mainstream phenomenon with significant implications for common notions of race… Continue Reading April 20 | “No, Really, What Percentage are You?”: Genomics, Race, and Genetic Ancestry Testing

Oct 09 | Meet & Greet

Wednesday, October 09, 2019 4:00-5:30 PM SJRC Common Room, Oakes 231 Please join us for a beginning of quarter social hour. In addition to a chance to celebrate the new academic year and enjoy each other’s company over nice food and drink, we will be welcoming new members of our community, and welcoming back others.… Continue Reading Oct 09 | Meet & Greet

Oct 16 | Ruja Benjamin

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 Details coming soon… Ruha Benjamin is an Associate Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, where she studies the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine. Ruha is the founder of the JUST DATA Lab and the author of two books, People’s Science  (Stanford) and Race After Technology (Polity), and editor of Captivating Technology (Duke). Ruha… Continue Reading Oct 16 | Ruja Benjamin

Dec 04 | Surrogate Humanity: Race, Robots, and the Politics of Technological Futures

Wednesday, December 04, 2019 4:00-6:00 PM Location TBD Co-authors Neda Atanasoski (UCSC Feminist Studies, CRES) and Kalindi Vora (UC Davis Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies) will present on their new book Surrogate Humanity: Race, Robots, and the Politics of Technological Futures (Duke University Press, March 2019).   Book Description In Surrogate Humanity Neda Atanasoski and Kalindi Vora trace the ways in which robots, artificial… Continue Reading Dec 04 | Surrogate Humanity: Race, Robots, and the Politics of Technological Futures