Oct 22 | Superfest | International Film Festival

Oct 22 – 23 | Multiple times and locations

superfest2016 marks 30 years of disability and cinema. Superfest, the world’s longest running disability film festival, celebrates disability as a creative force in cinema and culture. It features films with fresh ideas and images that inspire thought and meaningful conversation.  Times and locations for the 2016 film selections can be found here.

 

Sept 13 | Blum Center | SEEDS, SOILS and POLITICS: An Anthropology Roundtable

Blum Seeds and Soils

Twenty anthropologists and ethnographers from across Africa, Asia, Latin America, and North America will discuss new forms of public and private governance over seeds and soils, how these influence farmers engagement, and how do citizens mobilize to regain control over the seeds and soils on which their daily sustenance, their health and well-being depend.

By considering the relationship of farmers with the living things of soil and seeds together with their relationship to different forms of national and international policy-making, anthropologists engage this comprehensive approach to examine how environmental change is co-created through policies and practices. They will share the outcome of their recent discussions in this roundtable.

Contemporary ways of cultivating and agricultural development strategies are framed by the marketplace: typically today such measures are privatized, corporate, and profit driven, and thus they frequently neglect or even devalue local survival strategies among the world’s poorest. Please join in this public panel that will address the ways in which states and corporations govern living objects that shape peoples’ sustenance, determine the survival of mankind, and the quality of life which have fueled the mobilization of citizens worldwide. Anthropologists have started to analyze the discourses and strategies of farmers, foodies and environmentalists who try to shed the status of consumer, stakeholder or expert and reclaim the status of citizens and of food sovereignty instead of food security. How is the issue of citizenship, the right to food, the claim to be protected from fake food and seeds reformulated? How do these notions impact on decision-making, and the notion/perception of economic democracy?

 

Co-sponsored by the Wenner Gren Foundation, National Science Foundation, UCSC Blum Center, Science and Justice Research Center, and UCSC Dept. of Anthropology.

 

September 13 | 2:00-4:30pm | Louden Nelson Community Center, room 1

Sept 11 | Paul Edwards

12PM-1:30PM | Humanities 1, rm 210

Paul N. Edwards (Professor, School of Information and Department of History, University of Michigan) will present ‘Afterworld: Technosphere, Anthropocene, Geostory’. Edwards’ current research concerns the history and future of knowledge infrastructures, the history of climate science, and other large-scale information infrastructures. Edwards is the author most recently of A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (2010). See more.

Oct 19 | SFSU Women’s and Gender Studies

12:35PM-1:50PM SFSU, Humanities 119

On October 19th S&J Assistant Director, Katherine Weatherford Darling, will present on “Chronic Crisis: Managing HIV as a Chronic Condition in Biomedicalized Bureaucracies”. And on November 2nd S&J Faculty Affiliate and Feminist Science Studies Assistant Professor, Kristina Lyons will present on “Evidentiary Ecologies and Variations of Justice: Science & Nature in Times of War and Peace”.

SFSU Lecture Series Poster

SJTP fellow awarded AAUW fellowship

Congratulations to Science and Justice Training Program Fellow and past Graduate Student Researcher, Lizzy Hare (Anthropology), for being awarded a 2016-2017 fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

Read the full story here.

More on Lizzy’s research can be found here.

May 24 | Reading Group: Eben Kirksey on Emergent Ecologies

Tuesday, May 24, 2016 | 4:00-6:00PM | Oakes College Mural Room

In an eEmergent Ecologies - book coverra of global warming, natural disasters, endangered species, and devastating pollution, contemporary writing on the environment largely focuses on doomsday scenarios. Eben Kirksey suggests we reject such apocalyptic thinking and instead find possibilities in the wreckage of ongoing disasters, as symbiotic associations of opportunistic plants, animals, and microbes are flourishing in unexpected places. Emergent Ecologies uses artwork and contemporary philosophy to illustrate hopeful opportunities and reframe key problems in conservation biology such as invasive species, extinction, environmental management, and reforestation. Following the flight of capital and nomadic forms of life—through fragmented landscapes of Panama, Costa Rica, and the United States—Kirksey explores how chance encounters, historical accidents, and parasitic invasions have shaped present and future multispecies communities. New generations of thinkers and tinkerers are learning how to care for emergent ecological assemblages—involving frogs, fungal pathogens, ants, monkeys, people, and plants—by seeding them, nurturing them, protecting them, and ultimately letting go.

Selected Readings: Emergent Ecologies: Chapters 5 6 7

Eben Kirksey is a permanent faculty member in Environmental Humanities at UNSW Australia and a Visiting Research Scholar at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is the editor of The Multispecies Salon and the author of Freedom in Entangled Worlds: West Papua and the Architecture of Global Power, both also published by Duke University Press.

May 18 | Just Data? Justice, Knowledge and Care in an Age of Precision Medicine

The “Just Data?” meeting at UCSC aims to broaden the public discussion about big data and health from ethical and legal questions about privacy and informed consent to more fundamental questions about the right and just constitution of care, trust, and knowledge in an age of biomedical data. This agenda-setting workshop will gather international leaders in genomics, health and informatics, civil rights, bioethics, indigenous rights, science policy and the social study of health and medicine. The meeting will be broken into two phases: 1) Discussion of critical challenges, problems and promises; 2) Collaborative work to set the science and justice agenda of big biodata and precision medicine.

For full event and registration information, please visit: https://justdataucsc.wordpress.com/

Co-Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the NHGRI program of the NIH, the UC North Bioethics Collaboratory, and the UCSC Genomics Institute.

May 18-19 | Alumni Room, University Center, UC Santa Cruz

May 04 | A Book Talk with Donna Haraway

Manifestly Haraway

The Center for Emerging Worlds and the Center for Cultural Studies together with the Science and Justice Research Center will host a conversation with Donna Haraway and Cary Wolfe on the recently released Manifestly Haraway (University of Minnesota Press).

A reception will follow.

Manifestly Haraway brings together Donna Haraway’s seminal “Cyborg Manifesto” and “Companion Species Manifesto.” Manifestly Haraway also includes a wide-ranging conversation between Haraway and Cary Wolfe on the history and meaning of the manifestos in the context of biopolitics, feminism, Marxism, human-nonhuman relationships, making kin, literary tropes, material semiotics, the negative way of knowing, secular Catholicism, and more.

Donna J. Haraway is distinguished professor emerita in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of, among other works, Primate Visions, Modest_Witness@Second_Millenium, and When Species Meet.

Cary Wolfe is Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English at Rice University, where he is also founding director of 3CT (Center for Critical and Cultural Theory). He is the author of Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, The Other Emerson (with Branka Arsic), and What Is Posthumanism?

 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 | 6:00-8:00PM | Humanities 1, room 210