Sept 11 | Paul Edwards

12PM-1:30PM | Humanities 1, rm 210

Paul N. Edwards (Professor, School of Information and Department of History, University of Michigan) will present ‘Afterworld: Technosphere, Anthropocene, Geostory’. Edwards’ current research concerns the history and future of knowledge infrastructures, the history of climate science, and other large-scale information infrastructures. Edwards is the author most recently of A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (2010). See more.

Oct 19 | SFSU Women’s and Gender Studies

12:35PM-1:50PM SFSU, Humanities 119

On October 19th S&J Assistant Director, Katherine Weatherford Darling, will present on “Chronic Crisis: Managing HIV as a Chronic Condition in Biomedicalized Bureaucracies”. And on November 2nd S&J Faculty Affiliate and Feminist Science Studies Assistant Professor, Kristina Lyons will present on “Evidentiary Ecologies and Variations of Justice: Science & Nature in Times of War and Peace”.

SFSU Lecture Series Poster

SJTP fellow awarded AAUW fellowship

Congratulations to Science and Justice Training Program Fellow and past Graduate Student Researcher, Lizzy Hare (Anthropology), for being awarded a 2016-2017 fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

Read the full story here.

More on Lizzy’s research can be found here.

May 24 | Reading Group: Eben Kirksey on Emergent Ecologies

Tuesday, May 24, 2016 | 4:00-6:00PM | Oakes College Mural Room

In an eEmergent Ecologies - book coverra of global warming, natural disasters, endangered species, and devastating pollution, contemporary writing on the environment largely focuses on doomsday scenarios. Eben Kirksey suggests we reject such apocalyptic thinking and instead find possibilities in the wreckage of ongoing disasters, as symbiotic associations of opportunistic plants, animals, and microbes are flourishing in unexpected places. Emergent Ecologies uses artwork and contemporary philosophy to illustrate hopeful opportunities and reframe key problems in conservation biology such as invasive species, extinction, environmental management, and reforestation. Following the flight of capital and nomadic forms of life—through fragmented landscapes of Panama, Costa Rica, and the United States—Kirksey explores how chance encounters, historical accidents, and parasitic invasions have shaped present and future multispecies communities. New generations of thinkers and tinkerers are learning how to care for emergent ecological assemblages—involving frogs, fungal pathogens, ants, monkeys, people, and plants—by seeding them, nurturing them, protecting them, and ultimately letting go.

Selected Readings: Emergent Ecologies: Chapters 5 6 7

Eben Kirksey is a permanent faculty member in Environmental Humanities at UNSW Australia and a Visiting Research Scholar at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is the editor of The Multispecies Salon and the author of Freedom in Entangled Worlds: West Papua and the Architecture of Global Power, both also published by Duke University Press.

May 18 | Just Data? Justice, Knowledge and Care in an Age of Precision Medicine

The “Just Data?” meeting at UCSC aims to broaden the public discussion about big data and health from ethical and legal questions about privacy and informed consent to more fundamental questions about the right and just constitution of care, trust, and knowledge in an age of biomedical data. This agenda-setting workshop will gather international leaders in genomics, health and informatics, civil rights, bioethics, indigenous rights, science policy and the social study of health and medicine. The meeting will be broken into two phases: 1) Discussion of critical challenges, problems and promises; 2) Collaborative work to set the science and justice agenda of big biodata and precision medicine.

For full event and registration information, please visit: https://justdataucsc.wordpress.com/

Co-Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the NHGRI program of the NIH, the UC North Bioethics Collaboratory, and the UCSC Genomics Institute.

May 18-19 | Alumni Room, University Center, UC Santa Cruz

May 04 | A Book Talk with Donna Haraway

Manifestly Haraway

The Center for Emerging Worlds and the Center for Cultural Studies together with the Science and Justice Research Center will host a conversation with Donna Haraway and Cary Wolfe on the recently released Manifestly Haraway (University of Minnesota Press).

A reception will follow.

Manifestly Haraway brings together Donna Haraway’s seminal “Cyborg Manifesto” and “Companion Species Manifesto.” Manifestly Haraway also includes a wide-ranging conversation between Haraway and Cary Wolfe on the history and meaning of the manifestos in the context of biopolitics, feminism, Marxism, human-nonhuman relationships, making kin, literary tropes, material semiotics, the negative way of knowing, secular Catholicism, and more.

Donna J. Haraway is distinguished professor emerita in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of, among other works, Primate Visions, Modest_Witness@Second_Millenium, and When Species Meet.

Cary Wolfe is Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English at Rice University, where he is also founding director of 3CT (Center for Critical and Cultural Theory). He is the author of Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, The Other Emerson (with Branka Arsic), and What Is Posthumanism?

 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 | 6:00-8:00PM | Humanities 1, room 210

Job Announcement: SJRC Assistant Director

UC Santa Cruz: Assistant Director of Research and Academic Programs

(Job# JPF00358-16T)

Oakes AD Advertisement

The Science and Justice Research Center (SJRC), affiliated with the Department of Sociology, at the University of California, Santa Cruz is pleased to announce an Assistant Director of Research and Academic Programs position.

The SJRC brings together faculty and graduate students from across all divisions of the University to address contemporary problems that entangle questions of science and knowledge with those of ethics and justice. Reporting to the Director, the Assistant Director (AD) will contribute to SJRC’s efforts to foster a new domain of research, teaching and institution building in science and justice. Possible related areas of research and teaching might include biodata and society, ecology and justice, environmental modeling and environmental politics, and technoscience and difference. The AD will:

  • develop the Center’s research profile through grant-writing and building research programs that reflect the Center’s research foci
  • develop the Center’s public profile
  • develop and teach up to two classes per academic year and help implement the Science and Justice Graduate Training program curriculum
  • develop collaborations with affiliated researchers, Centers, and Institutes both on and off-campus
  • publish or present one academic article annually.

Basic Qualifications: Ph.D. or foreign equivalent degree in Science and Technology Studies or closely allied field, expected to be conferred by April 1, 2017. Demonstrated record of research, teaching and grant writing in higher education.

Preferred Qualifications: Evidence of developed research profile or trajectory sufficient to meet the job responsibilities; demonstrated experience in institution-building e.g. developing institutional linkages and forging consensus; capacity to develop long-term visions including three-year plans for fundraising and academic output; training in a field of science or engineering; demonstration of interdisciplinary collaboration; demonstration of national and international leadership potential; experience working with social media platforms.

To Apply: Applications accepted via the UCSC Academic Recruit online system must include letter of application, curriculum vitae, three reference letters*, sample of published material, sample of a submitted grant proposal, statement of teaching pedagogy, and sample of course syllabus in area of research. Optional: applicants are invited to submit a statement addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and/or service. Optional: evidence of teaching excellence, provide a link in your curriculum vitae or letter of application to an audio/video of a public presentation in digital format. Materials must be submitted in PDF format unless stated otherwise.

To apply, visit: https://recruit.ucsc.edu/apply/JPF00358

POSITION AVAILABLE: July 1, 2016; with the academic year beginning September 17, 2016. Initial review date is May 20, 2016.

For more information about this recruitment, visit: http://apo.ucsc.edu/academic_employment/jobs/JPF00358-16T.pdf or contact scijust@ucsc.edu. Please refer to Position #JPF00358-16T in all correspondence.

For more information about this position, please see the Job Description.

Apr 20 | Digital Dreams and Their Discontents: Where do we go from here?

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | 4:00 – 5:30PM | SJRC Common Room (Oakes 231)

A conversation with Erin McElroy (PhD Candidate, Feminist Studies, UCSC) and Sara Tocchetti (SJRC Visiting Scholar, Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre Alexandre Koyré, Paris, France).

Erin McElroy on the Digital Nomad

With the emergence of Silicon Valley’s “Tech Boom 2.0,” so too has emerged the figure of the “digital nomad”—a type of transient technologic worker tethered to Silicon Valley corporations yet able to embody new mobilities vis-à-vis the globalization of high-speed fiber-optics and sharing economy infrastructure. From San Francisco to new global outposts such as Romania, which boasts the world’s fifth fastest internet speed due to postsocialist technologic economization, the arrival of the digital nomad often incites contexts of gentrification, manifesting as increased rental prices, eviction rates, and forced homelessness/nomadism. Critical of this correlation as well as formative histories of nomadic racial fantasy, I also question what other uses of digital technology, such as that of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, emerge not just to critique technologies of displacement, but also to fight for other futures of the digital?

Erin McElroy is a Doctoral Student in Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz and cofounder/director of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, a digital cartography and oral history collective documenting the ecology of “Tech Boom” induced gentrification. McElroy brings a spatial analysis and collective ethos to their research, which studies materializations and histories of dispossessive technologies in Romania, employing ethnography, literary/cultural analysis, and archival work, and utilizing postsocialist analytics and feminist science and technology studies. McElroy holds a MA in Cultural Anthropology from CIIS and a BA in Cultural Studies from Hampshire College, and is an active anti-eviction organizer with Eviction Free San Francisco.

Sara Tocchetti on DIYbio and the Possibility of Critical Life Sciences

Drawing from the analogy with the personal computer and other personalized technologies, DIYbio members envision biology and biotechnology as a creative and personal technology to be made available to everyone. Such ideology of a ‘personal biology’ can be understood as a variation of ‘digital utopianism’ and seems especially attractive for young and/or disenfranchised students and researchers. Working through several case studies of DIYbio initiatives and engaging with a general sense of enthusiasm for such practices expressed in the STS literature, this presentation questions what type of critical space does digital utopianism occupies in the life sciences and STS and what forms of alternative practices we might need to recollect and/or imagine.

Sara Tocchetti recently received her PhD from the London School of Economics working on the DIYbio network, socio-technical utopias, theories of technology driven social change, and her own professional identity. Feeling stuck as an ex-biologist-not-yet turned into a science and technology studies scholar, she has moved on to study the history and present of radical science movements and is currently based at the Centre Alexandre Koyré in Paris on an Early Post-doc Scholarship from the Swiss National Fund. Her recent publications includes Is an FBI Agent a DIY Biologist Like Any Other? A Cultural Analysis of a Biosecurity Risk (Tocchetti and Aguiton, 2015) and Quelles tactiques critiques sur le terrain des promesses scientifiques [Which critical tactics in the field of scientific promises] (Aguiton, Bovet and Tocchetti, 2015).